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1,037 Entries
Reflection for the Day  
02/08

Comments:
FEBRUARY 9 Reflection for the Day

The slogan “Live and Let Live” can be extremely helpful when we are having trouble tolerating other people’s behaviour. We know for certain that nobody’s behaviour – no matter how offensive, distasteful, or vicious – is worth the price of a relapse. Our own recovery is primary, and while we must be unafraid of walking away from people or situations that cause us discomfort, we must also make a special effort to try to understand other people – especially those who rub us the wrong way.

Can I accept the fact that, in my recovery, it is more important to understand than to be understood?

Today I Pray
When I run headlong into someone’s unpleasant behaviour, may I first try my best to understand. Then, if my abstinence from gambling seems threatened, may I have the courage to remove myself from the situation.

Today I Will Remember
Live and let live.


Hazelden Thought for the Day  
02/08

Comments:

February 8th Hazelden Thought for the Day 

Letting Go of Guilt

Feeling good about ourselves is a choice. So is feeling guilty. When guilt is legitimate, it acts as a warning light, signaling that we're off course. Then its purpose is finished.

Wallowing in guilt allows others to control us. It makes us feel not good enough. It prevents us from setting boundaries and taking other healthy action to care for ourselves.

We may have learned to habitually feel guilty as an instinctive reaction to life. Now we know that we don't have to feel guilty. Even if we've done something that violates a value, extended guilt does not solve the problem; it prolongs the problem. So make an amend. Change a behavior. Then let guilt go.

Today, God, help me to become entirely ready to let go of guilt. Please take it from me, and replace it with self-love.

From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved


Donna Email
02/08

Last Day You Placed A Bet 7/14/15

Location Florida

Comments:
2/8/20 Saturday   Hi my name is Donna and I am a Compulsive Gambler in Recovery, checking in.  It's Saturday, time to laundry, and errands.  Just for today I will remain Gamble Free, ODAAT.


Reflection for the Day  
02/07

Comments:
FEBRUARY 8 Reflection for the Day

When we first stopped gambling, it was an enormous relief to find that the people we met in the Gamblers Anonymous Program seemed quite different than those apparently hostile masses we know as “they.” We were met, not with criticism and suspicion, but with understanding and concern. However, we still encounter people who get on our nerves, both within the Program and outside it. Obviously, we must begin to accept the fact that there are people who’ll sometimes say things we disagree with, or do things we don’t like.

Am I beginning to see that learning to live with differences is essential to my comfort and, in turn, to my continuing recovery?

Today I Pray
May I recognize that people’s differences make our world go around and tolerate people who “rub me the wrong way.” May I understand that I must give them room, that some of my hostile attitudes toward others may be leftovers from the unhealthy days when I tended to view others as mobilized against me.

Today I Will Remember
Learn to live with differences.


Hazelden Thought for the Day  
02/07

Comments:

February 7th Hazelden Thought for the Day 

Owning Our Power


We need to make a distinction between powerlessness and owning our power.

The first step in recovery is accepting powerlessness. There are some things we can't do, no matter how long or hard we try. These things include changing other people, solving their problems, and controlling their behavior. Sometimes, we feel powerless over ourselves - what we feel or believe, or the effects of a particular situation or person on us.

It's important to surrender to powerlessness, but it's equally important to own our power. We aren't trapped. We aren't helpless. Sometimes it may feel like we are, but we aren't. We each have the God-given power, and the right, to take care of ourselves in any circumstance, and with any person. The middle ground of self-care lies between the two extremes of controlling others and allowing them to control us. We can walk that ground gently or assertively, but in confidence that it is our right and responsibility.

Let the power come to walk that path.

Today, I will remember that I can take care of my self. I have choices, and I can exercise the options I choose without guilt.

From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. 


Donna Email
02/07

Last Day You Placed A Bet 7/14/15

Location Florida

Comments:
2/7/20   Friday   Hi my name is Donna and I am a Compulsive Gambler in Recovery, checking in.  Today is a half day for us at work, so after work, I'm taking my new addition to my home Roxy to the beach.  Just for today I will remain Gamble Free, ODAAT.


Reflection for the Day  
02/06

Comments:
FEBRUARY 7 Reflection for the Day

Honesty is a word I had to be reacquainted with. Before coming to Gamblers Anonymous, I bounced lies and half-truths around so often in my head that I believed they were all true. Today I strive for rigorous honesty – with myself and with others. Above all, I must always remain honest with myself about where the credit for my recovery belongs – with my Higher Power and the Fellowship of GA.

Have I accepted the fact that self-deception can only damage me, providing a clouded and unrealistic picture of the person I really am?

Today I Pray
May God allow me to push aside my curtain of fibs, alibis, rationalizations, justifications, distortions, and downright lies and let in the light on the real truths about myself. May I meet the person I really am and take comfort in the person I can become.

Today I Will Remember
Hello, Me. Meet the real Me.


Hazelden Thought for the Day  
02/06

Comments:

February 6th Hazelden Thought for the Day

Stopping Victimization


Before recovery, many of us lacked a frame of reference with which to name the victimization and abuse in our life. We may have thought it was normal that people mistreated us. We may have believed we deserved mistreatment; we may have been attracted to people who mistreated us.

We need to let go, on a deep level, of our need to be victimized and to be victims. We need to let go of our need to be in dysfunctional relationships and systems at work, in love, in family relationships, in friendships. We deserve better. We deserve much better. It is our right. When we believe in our right to happiness, we will have happiness.

We will fight for that right, and the fight will emerge from our souls. Break free from oppression and victimization.

Today, I will liberate myself by letting go of my need to be a victim, and I'll explore my freedom to take care of myself. That liberation will not take me further away from people I love. It will bring me closer to people and more in harmony with God's plan for my life.

From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved.


Donna Email
02/06

Last Day You Placed A Bet 7/14/15

Location Florida

Comments:
2/6/20  Thursday   Hi my name is Donna,  I am in Recovery for Gambling.  Checking in, working a lot of hours because of Tax Season, and busy with taking care of my new addition, Roxy my adopted Senior Dog.  Just for today I will remain Gamble Free, ODAAT.


Reflection for the Day  
02/05

Comments:

FEBRUARY 6 Reflection for the Day

I used to be an expert at unrealistic self-appraisal. At certain times, I would look only at that part of my life that seemed good. Then I would magnify whatever real or imagined virtues I had attained. Next, I would pat myself on the back for the fantastic job I was doing in the Program. Naturally, this generated a craving for still more “accomplishments” and still greater approval. Wasn’t that the pattern of my days during active addiction? The difference now, though, is that I can use the best alibi known – the spiritual alibi.

Do I sometimes rationalize willful actions and nonsensical behavior in the name of “spiritual objectives”?

Today I Pray
God help me to know if I still crave attention and approval to the point of inflating my own virtues and magnifying my accomplishments in the Program or anywhere. May I keep a realistic perspective about my good points, even as I learn to respect myself.

Today I Will Remember
Learn to control inflation.

 


Hazelden Thought for the Day  
02/05

Comments:

February 5th Hazelden Thought for the Day

Don't compromise yourself. You are all you've got.

  —Janis Joplin

When we don't know who we are, it's easy to compromise ourselves. When we don't know where we stand on an issue, it's easy to be swayed by a forceful voice. Values may be cloudy in our minds, or we may not be aware of them at all. It's then that we are vulnerable to the persuasion of another. In this Twelve Step program, we are offered the way to know ourselves. We are supported in our efforts, and we realize we have friends who don't want us to compromise ourselves - who value our struggle to know and to be true to ourselves.

One of recovery's greatest gifts is discovering we can make decisions that represent us, our inner selves, and those decisions please us. We all are familiar with the tiny tug of shame that locates itself in our solar plexus. When we "go along," when we "give in" on a personally important issue, we pay a consequence. We lose a bit of ourselves. Over the years we've lost many bits. We have a choice, however.

I will have a chance, soon, to act according to my wishes. I will take it.

 

From Each Day a New Beginning: Daily Meditations for Women by Karen Casey © 1982, 1991 by Hazelden Foundation


Donna Email
02/05

Last Day You Placed A Bet 7/14/15

Location Florida

Comments:
2/5/20  Wednesday  Hi my name is Donna and I am a Compulsive Gambler in Recovery, worked a double last night.  Still Gamble Free, ODAAT.


Hazelden Thought for the Day  
02/04

Comments:

February 4th Hazelden Thought for the Day  

Enjoying Recovery


What a journey!

This process of growth and change takes us along an ever-changing road. Sometimes the way is hard and craggy. Sometimes we climb mountains. Sometimes we slide down the other side on a toboggan.

Sometimes we rest.

Sometimes we grope through the darkness. Sometimes we're blinded by sunlight.

At times many may walk with us on the road; sometimes we feel nearly alone.

Ever changing, always interesting, always leading someplace better, someplace good.

What a journey!

Today, God, help me relax and enjoy the scenery. Help me know I'm right where I need to be on my journey.

From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved


Reflection for the Day  
02/04

Comments:

FEBRUARY 5 Reflection for the Day

If I am troubled, worried, exasperated, or frustrated, do I tend to rationalize the situation and lay the blame on someone else? When I am in such a state, is my conversation punctuated with, “He did…….,” “She said…….,” “They did…….,”? Or can I honestly admit that perhaps I’m at fault. My peace of mind depends on overcoming my negative attitudes and my tendency to rationalize.

Will I try, day by day, to be rigorously honest with myself?

Today I Pray
May I catch myself as I talk in the third person, “He did…,” or “They promised…,” or “She said she would…” and listen for the blaming that has become such a pattern for me and preserves delusion. May I do a turnabout and face myself instead.

Today I Will Remember
Honesty is the only policy.

 


Donna Email
02/04

Last Day You Placed A Bet 7/14/15

Location Florida

Comments:
2/4/20  Tuesday    Hi my name is Donna and I am a Compulsive Gambler in Recovery.  With my new addition to my little house Roxie, she keeps me company,and I think that's what I needed.  Just for today I will remain Gamble Free, ODAAT.


Reflection for the Day  
02/03

Comments:
FEBRUARY 4 Reflection for the Day

Rare is the recovering compulsive gambler who will now dispute the fact that denial is a primary symptom of the illness. The Gamblers Anonymous Program teaches us that compulsive gambling actually tells the afflicted person that he or she really isn’t sick at all. Not surprisingly, then, our lives as addictive gamblers were characterized by endless rationalizations and dishonesty and, in short, a steadfast unwillingness to accept the fact that we were, without question, emotionally and mentally different from our fellows.

Have I admitted to my innermost self that I am truly powerless over my compulsion to gamble?

Today I Pray
May the First Step be not half-hearted for me, but a total admission of powerlessness over my addiction. May I rid myself of that first symptom – denial – which refuses to recognize any other symptom of my illness.

Today I Will Remember
Deny denial.


Hazelden Thought for the Day  
02/03

Comments:

February 3rd Hazelden Thought for the Day 

Rejecting Shame

Shame can be a powerful force in our life. It is the trademark of dysfunctional families.

Authentic, legitimate guilt is the feeling or thought that what we did is not okay. It indicates that our behavior needs to be corrected or altered, or an amend needs to be made.

Shame is an overwhelming negative sense that who we are isn't okay. Shame is a no-win situation. We can change our behaviors, but we can't change who we are. Shame can propel us deeper into self-defeating and sometimes self-destructive behaviors.

What are the things that can cause us to feel shame? We may feel ashamed when we have a problem or someone we love has a problem. We may feel ashamed for making mistakes or for succeeding. We may feel ashamed about certain feelings or thoughts. We may feel ashamed when we have fun, feel good, or are vulnerable enough to show ourselves to others. Some of us feel ashamed just for being.

Shame is a spell others put on us to control us, to keep us playing our part in dysfunctional systems. It is a spell many of us have learned to put on ourselves.

Learning to reject shame can change the quality of our life. It's okay to be who we are. We are good enough. Our feelings are okay. Our past is okay. It's okay to have problems, make mistakes, and struggle to find our path. It's okay to be human and cherish our humanness.

Accepting ourselves is the first step toward recovery. Letting go of shame about who we are is the next important step.

Today, I will watch for signs that I have fallen into shame's trap. If I get hooked into shame, I will get myself out by accepting myself and affirming that it's okay to be who I am.

From The Language of Letting Go by Melody Beattie ©1990, Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved


Donna Email
02/03

Last Day You Placed A Bet 7/14/15

Location Florida

Comments:
2/3/20  Monday  Hi my name is Donna and I am a Compulsive Gambler in Recovery, checking in.  Now that I have Roxie my adopted senior dog she's great company.  A quiet weekend, just for today I will remain Gamble Free, ODAAT.


Reflection of the Day 
02/02

Comments:
FEBRUARY 3 Reflection for the Day

Gamblers Anonymous enables us to discover two roadblocks that keep us from seeing the value and comfort of the spiritual approach: self-justification and self-righteousness. The first grimly assures me that I’m always right. The second mistakenly comforts me with the delusion that I’m better than other people – “holier than thou.”

Just for today, will I pause abruptly while rationalizing and ask myself why I am doing this, and whether my self-justification is really honest?

Today I Pray
May I overcome the need to be “always right” and know the cleansing feeling of release that comes with admitting, openly, a mistake. May I be wary of setting myself up as an example of self-control and fortitude, and give credit where it is due – to a Higher Power.

Today I Will Remember
To err is human, but I need to admit it.


Hazelden Thought for the Day  
02/02

Comments:

February 2nd Hazelden Thought for the Day  

Fear is the absence of faith.
  —Paul Tillich

We all experience fear. Sometimes we fear small things that only seem large at the time, like a test in school, or meeting a new boss, or going to the dentist. Sometimes we fear big things like serious illness or death, or that someone we love will come to harm. Fear is healthy, and we all feel it. It keeps us from doing foolish things sometimes, but too much fear can also keep us from doing what we need for our growth.

If we have faith in God and in ourselves, we can turn and face whatever frightens us, believing we can, with help, do what seems impossible. And we will, and the fear will vanish. The important first step in dealing with fear is to take action--either by tackling what we fear ourselves, or by asking for help. Each time we face our fear, we gain strength, courage, and confidence in the doing.

What am I most afraid of?

From Today's Gift: Daily Meditations for Families ©1985, 1991 by Hazelden Foundation. All rights reserved. 
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